C 副词moreover(而且)类似于but also,表递进含义;

C 副词moreover(而且)类似于but also,表递进含义;作文怎么办

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2.D前面adding,deleting,replacing,reordering都是revising的方面,inotherwords意为“换句话说”,符合题意。inparticular...

2.D 前面adding, deleting, replacing, reordering都是revising的方面,in other words意为“换句话说”,符合题意。in particular意为“尤其,特别”,表强调;as a result意为“因此”,表结果;for example意为“例如”,表举例说明;都不符题意。 3.A 人们观看的是完美的表演,但表演之前作品经历了(undergo)多次修改,与上文的“Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical Phantom of the Opera underwent such a process.”对应。skip(跳远)、reject(拒绝,抵制)、replace(取代)都不符合题意。 5.B 介词短语in addition to表示“而且,除……之外还有”;in opposition to表示“与……的意见相反”;in contrast to表示“与……形成对比”,都与本题不符。in response to(作为对……的反应)在本句表示“你修改作品是对你想改进作品的一种回应”。 15.A unnecessary details表示“不必要的信息”,句意表示不必要的信息反而使读者困惑、误导读者。形容词uninteresting(单调的,乏味的)、concrete(具体的)、final(最终的,决定性的)都与题意不符。 阅读理解。 Students and Technology in the Classroom I love my Blackberry—it's my little connection to the larger world that can go anywhere with me. I also love my laptop computer,as it holds all of my writing and thoughts.Despite this love of technology, I know that there are times when I need to move away from these device(设备) and truly communicate with others. On occasion,I teach a course called History Matters for a group of higher education managers. My goals for the class include a full discussion of historical themes and ideas.Because I want students to thoroughly study the material and exchange their ideas with each other in the classroom,I have a rule—no laptops, iPads, phones, etc.When students were told my rule in advance of the class, some of them were not happy. Most students assume that my reasons for this rule include unpleasant experiences in the past with students misusing technology. There's a bit of truth to that.Some students assume that I am anti­technology. There's no truth in that at all. I love technology and try to keep up with it so I can relate to my students. The real reason why I ask students to leave technology at the door is that I think there are very few places in which we can have deep conversations and truly engage complex ideas. Interruptions by technology often break concentration and allow for too much dependence on outside information for ideas. I want students to dig deep within themselves for inspiration and ideas. I want them to push each other to think differently and to make connections between course material and the class discussion. I've been teaching my history class in this way for many years and the evaluations reflect student satisfaction with the environment that I create.Students realize that with deep conversation and challenge, they learn at a level that helps them keep the course material beyond the classroom. I'm not saying that I won't ever change my mind about technology use in my history class, but until I hear a really good reason for the change,I'm sticking to my plan. A few hours of technology­free dialogue is just too sweet to give up. 本文是一篇议论文。作者是一位老师,非常喜欢高科技产品,但是为了让他的学生在课堂上讨论历史话题、互相交流观点,他规定在课堂上学生不允许使用手提电脑、iPads及电话。刚开始学生不能理解,但是后来在对学生的学习评估中,学生对这一方法还是非常满意的。 15.A unnecessary details表示“不必要的信息”,句意表示不必要的信息反而使读者困惑、误导读者。形容词uninteresting(单调的,乏味的)、concrete(具体的)、final(最终的,决定性的)都与题意不符。 阅读理解。 Students and Technology in the Classroom I love my Blackberry—it's my little connection to the larger world that can go anywhere with me. I also love my laptop computer,as it holds all of my writing and thoughts.Despite this love of technology, I know that there are times when I need to move away from these device(设备) and truly communicate with others. On occasion,I teach a course called History Matters for a group of higher education managers. My goals for the class include a full discussion of historical themes and ideas.Because I want students to thoroughly study the material and exchange their ideas with each other in the classroom,I have a rule—no laptops, iPads, phones, etc.When students were told my rule in advance of the class, some of them were not happy. Most students assume that my reasons for this rule include unpleasant experiences in the past with students misusing technology. There's a bit of truth to that.Some students assume that I am anti­technology. There's no truth in that at all. I love technology and try to keep up with it so I can relate to my students. The real reason why I ask students to leave technology at the door is that I think there are very few places in which we can have deep conversations and truly engage complex ideas. Interruptions by technology often break concentration and allow for too much dependence on outside information for ideas. I want students to dig deep within themselves for inspiration and ideas. I want them to push each other to think differently and to make connections between course material and the class discussion. I've been teaching my history class in this way for many years and the evaluations reflect student satisfaction with the environment that I create.Students realize that with deep conversation and challenge, they learn at a level that helps them keep the course material beyond the classroom. I'm not saying that I won't ever change my mind about technology use in my history class, but until I hear a really good reason for the change,I'm sticking to my plan. A few hours of technology­free dialogue is just too sweet to give up. 本文是一篇议论文。作者是一位老师,非常喜欢高科技产品,但是为了让他的学生在课堂上讨论历史话题、互相交流观点,他规定在课堂上学生不允许使用手提电脑、iPads及电话。刚开始学生不能理解,但是后来在对学生的学习评估中,学生对这一方法还是非常满意的。 15.A unnecessary details表示“不必要的信息”,句意表示不必要的信息反而使读者困惑、误导读者。形容词uninteresting(单调的,乏味的)、concrete(具体的)、final(最终的,决定性的)都与题意不符。 阅读理解。 Students and Technology in the Classroom I love my Blackberry—it's my little connection to the larger world that can go anywhere with me. I also love my laptop computer,as it holds all of my writing and thoughts.Despite this love of technology, I know that there are times when I need to move away from these device(设备) and truly communicate with others. On occasion,I teach a course called History Matters for a group of higher education managers. My goals for the class include a full discussion of historical themes and ideas.Because I want students to thoroughly study the material and exchange their ideas with each other in the classroom,I have a rule—no laptops, iPads, phones, etc.When students were told my rule in advance of the class, some of them were not happy. Most students assume that my reasons for this rule include unpleasant experiences in the past with students misusing technology. There's a bit of truth to that.Some students assume that I am anti­technology. There's no truth in that at all. I love technology and try to keep up with it so I can relate to my students. The real reason why I ask students to leave technology at the door is that I think there are very few places in which we can have deep conversations and truly engage complex ideas. Interruptions by technology often break concentration and allow for too much dependence on outside information for ideas. I want students to dig deep within themselves for inspiration and ideas. I want them to push each other to think differently and to make connections between course material and the class discussion. I've been teaching my history class in this way for many years and the evaluations reflect student satisfaction with the environment that I create.Students realize that with deep conversation and challenge, they learn at a level that helps them keep the course material beyond the classroom. I'm not saying that I won't ever change my mind about technology use in my history class, but until I hear a really good reason for the change,I'm sticking to my plan. A few hours of technology­free dialogue is just too sweet to give up. 本文是一篇议论文。作者是一位老师,非常喜欢高科技产品,但是为了让他的学生在课堂上讨论历史话题、互相交流观点,他规定在课堂上学生不允许使用手提电脑、iPads及电话。刚开始学生不能理解,但是后来在对学生的学习评估中,学生对这一方法还是非常满意的。 15.A unnecessary details表示“不必要的信息”,句意表示不必要的信息反而使读者困惑、误导读者。形容词uninteresting(单调的,乏味的)、concrete(具体的)、final(最终的,决定性的)都与题意不符。 阅读理解。 Students and Technology in the Classroom I love my Blackberry—it's my little connection to the larger world that can go anywhere with me. I also love my laptop computer,as it holds all of my writing and thoughts.Despite this love of technology, I know that there are times when I need to move away from these device(设备) and truly communicate with others. On occasion,I teach a course called History Matters for a group of higher education managers. My goals for the class include a full discussion of historical themes and ideas.Because I want students to thoroughly study the material and exchange their ideas with each other in the classroom,I have a rule—no laptops, iPads, phones, etc.When students were told my rule in advance of the class, some of them were not happy. Most students assume that my reasons for this rule include unpleasant experiences in the past with students misusing technology. There's a bit of truth to that.Some students assume that I am anti­technology. There's no truth in that at all. I love technology and try to keep up with it so I can relate to my students. The real reason why I ask students to leave technology at the door is that I think there are very few places in which we can have deep conversations and truly engage complex ideas. Interruptions by technology often break concentration and allow for too much dependence on outside information for ideas. I want students to dig deep within themselves for inspiration and ideas. I want them to push each other to think differently and to make connections between course material and the class discussion. I've been teaching my history class in this way for many years and the evaluations reflect student satisfaction with the environment that I create.Students realize that with deep conversation and challenge, they learn at a level that helps them keep the course material beyond the classroom. I'm not saying that I won't ever change my mind about technology use in my history class, but until I hear a really good reason for the change,I'm sticking to my plan. A few hours of technology­free dialogue is just too sweet to give up. 本文是一篇议论文。作者是一位老师,非常喜欢高科技产品,但是为了让他的学生在课堂上讨论历史话题、互相交流观点,他规定在课堂上学生不允许使用手提电脑、iPads及电话。刚开始学生不能理解,但是后来在对学生的学习评估中,学生对这一方法还是非常满意的。 15.A unnecessary details表示“不必要的信息”,句意表示不必要的信息反而使读者困惑、误导读者。形容词uninteresting(单调的,乏味的)、concrete(具体的)、final(最终的,决定性的)都与题意不符。 阅读理解。 Students and Technology in the Classroom I love my Blackberry—it's my little connection to the larger world that can go anywhere with me. I also love my laptop computer,as it holds all of my writing and thoughts.Despite this love of technology, I know that there are times when I need to move away from these device(设备) and truly communicate with others. On occasion,I teach a course called History Matters for a group of higher education managers. My goals for the class include a full discussion of historical themes and ideas.Because I want students to thoroughly study the material and exchange their ideas with each other in the classroom,I have a rule—no laptops, iPads, phones, etc.When students were told my rule in advance of the class, some of them were not happy. Most students assume that my reasons for this rule include unpleasant experiences in the past with students misusing technology. There's a bit of truth to that.Some students assume that I am anti­technology. There's no truth in that at all. I love technology and try to keep up with it so I can relate to my students. The real reason why I ask students to leave technology at the door is that I think there are very few places in which we can have deep conversations and truly engage complex ideas. Interruptions by technology often break concentration and allow for too much dependence on outside information for ideas. I want students to dig deep within themselves for inspiration and ideas. I want them to push each other to think differently and to make connections between course material and the class discussion. I've been teaching my history class in this way for many years and the evaluations reflect student satisfaction with the environment that I create.Students realize that with deep conversation and challenge, they learn at a level that helps them keep the course material beyond the classroom. I'm not saying that I won't ever change my mind about technology use in my history class, but until I hear a really good reason for the change,I'm sticking to my plan. A few hours of technology­free dialogue is just too sweet to give up. 本文是一篇议论文。作者是一位老师,非常喜欢高科技产品,但是为了让他的学生在课堂上讨论历史话题、互相交流观点,他规定在课堂上学生不允许使用手提电脑、iPads及电话。刚开始学生不能理解,但是后来在对学生的学习评估中,学生对这一方法还是非常满意的。 11.According to the author, the use of technology in the classroom may ________. A. keep students from doing independent thinking B. encourage students to have in­depth conversations C. help students to better understand complex themes D. affect students' concentration on course evaluation 答案: A。推理判断题。由第四段的“Interruptions by technology often break concentration and allow for too much dependence on outside information for ideas .”可知在教室内使用高科技产品使学生们对于外界信息过于依赖,不能独立思考。 15.A unnecessary details表示“不必要的信息”,句意表示不必要的信息反而使读者困惑、误导读者。形容词uninteresting(单调的,乏味的)、concrete(具体的)、final(最终的,决定性的)都与题意不符。 阅读理解。 Students and Technology in the Classroom I love my Blackberry—it's my little connection to the larger world that can go anywhere with me. I also love my laptop computer,as it holds all of my writing and thoughts.Despite this love of technology, I know that there are times when I need to move away from these device(设备) and truly communicate with others. On occasion,I teach a course called History Matters for a group of higher education managers. My goals for the class include a full discussion of historical themes and ideas.Because I want students to thoroughly study the material and exchange their ideas with each other in the classroom,I have a rule—no laptops, iPads, phones, etc.When students were told my rule in advance of the class, some of them were not happy. Most students assume that my reasons for this rule include unpleasant experiences in the past with students misusing technology. There's a bit of truth to that.Some students assume that I am anti­technology. There's no truth in that at all. I love technology and try to keep up with it so I can relate to my students. The real reason why I ask students to leave technology at the door is that I think there are very few places in which we can have deep conversations and truly engage complex ideas. Interruptions by technology often break concentration and allow for too much dependence on outside information for ideas. I want students to dig deep within themselves for inspiration and ideas. I want them to push each other to think differently and to make connections between course material and the class discussion. I've been teaching my history class in this way for many years and the evaluations reflect student satisfaction with the environment that I create.Students realize that with deep conversation and challenge, they learn at a level that helps them keep the course material beyond the classroom. I'm not saying that I won't ever change my mind about technology use in my history class, but until I hear a really good reason for the change,I'm sticking to my plan. A few hours of technology­free dialogue is just too sweet to give up. 本文是一篇议论文。作者是一位老师,非常喜欢高科技产品,但是为了让他的学生在课堂上讨论历史话题、互相交流观点,他规定在课堂上学生不允许使用手提电脑、iPads及电话。刚开始学生不能理解,但是后来在对学生的学习评估中,学生对这一方法还是非常满意的。

Students and Technology in the Classroom
I love my blackberry — it’s my little connection to the larger world that can go anywhere with me. I also love my laptop computer,as it holds all of my writing and thoughts. Despite this love of technology, I know that there are times when I need to move away from these devices(设备)and truly communicate with others.
On occasion, I teach a course called History Matters for a group of higher education managers. My goals for the class include a full discussion of historical themes and ideas. Because I want students to thoroughly study the material and exchange their ideas with each other in the classroom, I have a rule — no laptop, iPads, phones ,etc .When students were told my rule in advance of the class, some of them were not happy.
Most students assume that my reasons for this rule include unpleasant experiences in the past with students misusing technology. There’s a bit of truth to that. Some students assume that I am anti-technology. There’s no truth in that at all. I love technology and try to keep up with it so I can relate to my students.
The real reason why I ask students to leave technology at the door is that I think there are very few places in which we can have deep conversions and truly engage complex ideas. Interruptions by technology often break concentration and allow for too much dependence on outside information for ideas. I want students to dig deep within themselves for inspiration and ideas. I want them to push each other to think differently and make connections between the course the material and the class discussion.
I’ve been teaching my history class in this way for many years and the evaluations reflect student satisfaction with the environment that I create. Students realize that with deep conversation and challenge, they learn at a level that helps them keep the course material beyond the classroom.
I’m not saying that I won’t ever change my mind about technology use in my history class, but until I hear a really good reason for the change, I’m sticking to my plan. A few hours of technology-free dialogue is just too sweet to give up.
【小题1】Some of the students in the history class were unhappy with _______.

A.the course material
B.others’ misuse of technology
C.discussion topics
D.the author’s class regulations
【小题2】The underlined word “engage ”in paragraph 4 probably means _______.
A.exploreB.acceptC.changeD.reject
【小题3】According to the author, the use of technology in the classroom may _______.
A.keep students from doing independent thinking
B.encourage students to have in-depth conversations
C.help students to better understand complex themes
D.affect students’ concentration on course evaluation
【小题4】It can be inferred from the last paragraph that the author _______.
A.is quite stubborn
B.will give up teaching history
C.will change his teaching plan soon
D.values technology-free dialogues in his class

Is this happening in your neighborhood? Children, notebook computers stuck under their arms,  await the yellow bus for the trip to middle school. On the surface, the question of computers in  schools is a no-brainer. It would be strange to insist that today’s technology shouldn’t be used to make the classroom experience more individualized, more effective, more immediate, more exciting. Computers have been in schools more than 20 years---and probably even done some good.

But the idea of a personal computer as a necessary daily tool for every American grammar school pupil is altogether a different thing. Be aware of the seemingly attractive vision of 10-year-olds doing most of their work---and homework---on a computer. It is another illusory silver bullet(虚幻的能迅速解决问题的捷径之道) that promises to solve all of society’s ills through technology. Regardless of whether parents or taxpayers buy the machinery, it’s bad policy.

Determining the proper role of computers in schools is too important to be left to computer suppliers and educators. An educated public with clear and realistic expectations needs to help determine the right track for technology.

Educators forever seem to seek the ultimate in teaching tools. They are always preoccupied with innovation---junior high school, new math, whole language, open classrooms, and mastery learning, to name a few. Some ideas turned out well and over time have earned permanent positions in our education systems. Other reflected change for changes’ sake and wound up in the trash bin, where they belong.

Exactly what is to be solved with computers in schools? Are we looking to improve instructional capacity and flexibility? Are we trying to make teachers and aids more productive by letting students take advantage of programmed learning tools? This all sounds good, and much has been accomplished with computer-assisted instruction.

But that’s not the same as making the computer a symbol of well-tempered educational policy. There’s danger in the message that a child is not fully educated if he or she can’t surf the World  Wide Web skillfully, move around in Windows or the Founder, use a word processing program, or program in Logo or Basic.

These skills can be learned outside the classroom. Worse, the time it takes students to acquire them is time stolen from the teaching schedule---and that’s a bad trade.

And what kind of computers should be purchased? We’re not talking brand names. Most school systems don’t have the money to replace PCs or Macs on the two-to-three-year cycle that shifting technologies demand. On the other hand, $2500---the cost of just one computer---invested in books for the school library produces wealth that has, shall we say, a longer shelf life.

And who changes the factory culture of schoolrooms to allow computers to be more effective? And who teaches the teachers? These are the really tough issues---the ones that more hardware won’t solve.

Children are best served when schools contribute to shaping the solid foundations on which their future will be built. The student who can read with curiosity and understanding, who has mastered basic mathematical concepts, who can evaluate ideas critically, is the one schools should aim to produce.

57. A “no-brainer” in the third sentence of the first paragraph probably means __________.

A. something that is taken for granted

B. an idea that is brainless and foolish

C. a proposal that is not worthy of serious consideration

D. a machine that can never take the place of human brain

58. Who can determine the proper role of computers in schools?

A. Computer suppliers.                  B. Educators.

C. The educated public.                  D. All of the above.

59. According  to  the  author,  teaching  computer  in  the  school  classroom  is  bad practice because __________.

A. the computer is too expensive a luxury for school pupils

B. the pupils are not intelligently mature enough to master the skills

C. it takes too much time which might have been spent on regular courses

D. the pupils can learn nothing from computer-assisted instruction

60. In the last paragraph the author implies that __________.

A. computer skills contribute nothing to a proper education

B. computer teaching is an essential part of an education

C. the fundamental purpose of an education is being ignored

D. teachers should be taught how to teach computer skills

Kieron Williamson, a seven-year-old British boy, is being recognized as an art genius after selling 16 paintings for 18, 000 pounds in just 14 minutes. This boy has artistic skills that would be the envy of any serious painter and drawn comparisons to Pablo Picasso, a child prodigy(神童)who became one of the most recognized artists of the 20th century.

 It all began on a family holiday to Cornwall on the southwest English coast when Kieron was five. Inspired by the view, he asked his parents for his first sketch-pad (速写纸). From that moment on, he became deeply interested. While supportive, Kieron’s parents are careful not to push their son. He only paints when and what he wants.

 He has a waiting list of hundreds and requests for his works have been flooding in. His father said a sale of Kieron’s works held in November even drew a buyer from Japan. “We had people driving down that night, there were people on the door waiting to come in the morning who had been standing outside, the phones were going mad as soon as the door opened at nine o’clock and within 14 minutes all the 16 pictures had gone, ” he said.

All this talent, money and high praise could so easily go to a young boy’s head, but Kieron said his friends keep him grounded. “Some of them want to be as good as me and some of them think. . . Umn, ‘you are not too special’, ” he said.

    Kieron’s favourite painter is British artist Edward Seago and he has spent some of his earnings buying a work by his hero. The rest is being invested by his parents until he reaches 25. Kieron’s parents and his younger sister Billi-Jo don’t see him as anything other than a normal seven-year-old boy who likes to tear around the house and who’s mad about football. But for now, with so much still to learn, there’s only one thing he wants to be when he grows up. He said, “I think I’ll definitely be an artist. ”

26. According to Paragraph 1, we can know Kieron Williamson ________.

A. painted 16 paintings in only 14 minutes

B. draws as well as Picasso did

C. is one of the most recognized artists

D. has unusual ability in painting

27. What made Kieron Williamson begin to love painting?

A. His first sketch-pad.

B. His parents’ encouragement.

C. The view at the seaside.

D. His swimming near the coast.

28. In Kieron Williamson’s friends’ opinion, he ________.

A. is famous but a little proud

B. isn’t very special from other children

C. isn’t worth praising at all

D. is hard to get along with

29. It can be inferred from the last paragraph that ________.

A. Edward Seago thinks highly of Kieron’s painting

B. Kieron likes doing sports and painting instead of studying

C. Kieron’s family is very poor

D. Kieron wants to be a great painter

30. The passage mainly tells us________.

A. a seven-year-old painting genius

B. how to be a great painter

C. Kieron Williamson may become the second Picasso

D. the painting changed Kieron Williamson’s life greatly

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